Facts

Assembly Solar is projected to generate $20-25 million in property tax revenue over 25 years.

Assembly Solar will create an estimated 321 jobs during construction locally, 2,926 jobs statewide and a handful of permanent maintenance jobs after construction.

The project will be located within a boundary of roughly 1,200 acres of primarily fields and vacant land.

The Assembly Solar project will be constructed to the highest industry standards, including the use of tier 1 solar panels. The solar panels that will be used for the Assembly Solar project do not contain dangerous Gen X or PFAS chemicals. In fact, in 2018, DowDupont – the leading manufacturer of backsheets for tier 1 solar panels – issued a statement confirming that they do not use Gen X or PFAS in their backsheets.

Yes, solar energy is one of the lowest impact forms of energy production. Solar panels are low to the ground, do not produce any greenhouse gas emissions, are virtually noiseless, and do not create odors or harmful byproducts. Solar panels will not release any toxic or hazardous substances into the environment and no such substances are used during operation of the project. They also do not deplete natural resources or cause environmental damage through resource extraction and transportation. In addition, solar panels do not use significant amounts of water during operation, keeping this water available for farming and other activities.

The Assembly Solar Project will reduce carbon dioxide emissions by approximately 394,000 tons, which is equivalent to taking 77,702 cars off the road.

Solar projects are a temporary use of the land and all project infrastructure will be removed at the end of the life of the Assembly Solar project. Per the land agreements and county requirements, Ranger Power is required to restore the land to its pre-existing condition. In addition, Shiawassee County’s solar ordinance requires Ranger Power to post a bond that will cover the full cost of decommissioning the project and restoring the underlying property prior to the start of construction.

The panels do not produce a great deal of heat, but like any surface, could be warm to the touch on a hot sunny day. The panels would return to ambient temperature at night.

Panels do not create noise. Inverters make a slight hum, which would be inaudible to anyone outside the project area.

Read More in the News

WNEM 5: Massive energy park clears last step, construction to start this year

January 24, 2019

Read More ›

MLive: Michigan’s largest proposed solar farm gets green light

January 24, 2019

Read More ›

ABC 12: Large scale solar energy farm coming to Shiawassee County

January 23, 2019

Read More ›

Owosso Independent: Ranger Power to Invest $250 Million in County Solar Power Project

October 22, 2018

Read More ›

MLive: Few objections so far to big solar farm on Genesee County’s western border

October 21, 2018

Read More ›

ABC 12: Solar energy developer wants to invest $250 million in Shiawassee County project

October 17, 2018

Read More ›

WNEM 5: Solar panel farm to break ground in Mid-Michigan

October 17, 2018

Read More ›

Argus Press: Solar firm hopes to build massive array in Shiawassee County

October 17, 2018

Read More ›

MLive: Proposed Shiawassee solar farm would cover 1,200 acres in two townships

October 16, 2018

Read More ›

WNEM 5: Solar farm expected to bring jobs, positive economic impact to Mid-Michigan

October 12, 2018

Read More ›